With the closure of Analogue TV......

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Do you think anyone will be trying some pirate TV transmissions on the empty band? Even if it is just for the very short term, before the authorities jump on it.

I'm not sure.  What would you need to transmit a TV signal that is different from Radio?  I would like to see some frequencies set aside for amateur TV and Local TV.  Currently we do not have much scope to play with the technical side of things. I would love to broadcast 30 line TV over the air just for the fun of seeing how it would look 'off air; on the televisor as oppose to being 'broadcast' from a CD.

Colin-JB

On 13 March 2012 13:04, Terry Williams <(Address removed)> wrote:

Do you think anyone will be trying some pirate TV transmissions on the empty band? Even if it is just for the very short term, before the authorities jump on it.

Free thought + Free speech + Free radio = Anorak Nation


Colin Bates <(Address removed)> said:

I'm not sure. What would you need to transmit a TV signal that is
different from Radio? I would like to see some frequencies set aside for
amateur TV and Local TV. Currently we do not have much scope to play with
the technical side of things. I would love to broadcast 30 line TV over the
air just for the fun of seeing how it would look 'off air; on the televisor
as oppose to being 'broadcast' from a CD.

Colin-JB

I don't understand this "empty band" reference.  UHF Bands IV and V are still filled up - only with digital rather than analogue services.  The top end of Band V is to be cleared of TV for new wireless broadband services.  As for 'amateur TV' - never heard of the British Amateur Television Club  www.batc.org.uk ?

Tony Currie Currie <(Address removed)> said:



I don't understand this "empty band" reference. UHF Bands IV and V are
still filled up - only with digital rather than analogue services.

Sorry Tony, I am mistaken then, I thought the Digital frequency for TV was completely different from the analogue service - in the same way that that DAB is a different frequency to analogue radio. So what you are saying is that the existing frequency for analogue BBC (for example) will be retained, but just that the "new" signal will be broadcast in digital ? Have I understood you correctly?

Terry

Terry Williams <(Address removed)> said:

Tony Currie Currie <(Address removed)> said:



I don't understand this "empty band" reference. UHF Bands IV and V are
still filled up - only with digital rather than analogue services.

Sorry Tony, I am mistaken then, I thought the Digital frequency for TV was completely different from the analogue service - in the same way that that DAB is a different frequency to analogue radio.
So what you are saying is that the existing frequency for analogue BBC (for example) will be retained, but just that the "new" signal will be broadcast in digital ?
Have I understood you correctly?

Terry

Yes.  Prior to Digital switchover (DSO) the digital channnels were interleaved with the analogue ones (thus BBC-1 analogue might have been on channel 41 with Digital Mux 1 on 42).  Post-DSO the digital channels occupy the group of channels previously used for analogue - with a handful of exceptions.

Interesting idea about - shall we say - unofficial analogue TV broadcasts. The major downside is , in where digital only switchover has happened - pretty much everywhere , except London , kent , Tyneside and N Ireland , nobody would know you was there as nobody will be scanning the band for analogue TV any more. As already pointed out , there is no empty band as a result of digital switchover - the digital signals are just replacing the analogue ones. In fact , once switchover is complete in a few months time , the UHF TV band is actually being made smaller. The top of the band from approximately channel 62 up to channel 69 will no longer be used for TV. It is being re-allocated to so called 4G mobile data use (phone) , and a small segment between channels 35 and 37 - thats where analogue channel 5 used to be in most areas. This shrinking of the TV band is possible because it is possible to fit many more channels onto a single carrier frequency (around 8 with MP2 and more with MP4) in digital than with analogue (only 1). Also , with digital TV , UHF channels number right next to another one can be used from the same site without the two interfeering with each other - with analogue (PAL) TV , adjacent active frequencies had to be at least 3 channels apart to avoid cross modulation and patterning effects.

Terry Williams <(Address removed)> said:

Do you think anyone will be trying some pirate TV transmissions on the
empty band?
Even if it is just for the very short term, before the authorities jump
on it.

Up here in the progressive North-West, we got rid of analogue TV about four years ago. All that really happened (with a few minor exceptions), is that the analogue transmitters stayed on the same frequencies but got converted into digital transmitters and the digital programming shuffled across from the less powerful transmitters it had been previously carried on. The amount of the spectrum left by the passing of analogue TV is actually not that huge, and is already in test use for the new 4G mobile network (mainly), so I'd imagine there'd be nowhere for analogue pirate TV to go.

Also, I'm fairly sure that there's virtually nobody watching analogue TV these days anyway. More than likely, it will be noticed by people with analogue tuned recording devices who probably won't think about the need to upgrade, but as for the watching of 'live' analogue TV, I can't imagine there's anybody left that does.